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Allison Piano Hosts New York Trio

January 28, 2013 1 comment

J100The good folks at Allison Piano are carrying on their legacy of hosting great jazz pianists in Victoria.

This Friday, February 1st at 7:30 pm they welcome Toronto native Jamie Reynolds on a Canada-wide tour in support of his debut album Time With People.

Bassist Gary Wang and drummer Eric Doob, also rising young talents on the New York scene, will join Reynolds.

Reynolds’ album  features a dozen original compositions that have already received strong reviews in Downbeat Magazine and All About Jazz.

A listen on Reynold’s website reveals melodic, reflective, and deeply personal material, somewhat reminiscent of Keith Jarrett, that should suit the intimate Allison Piano venue perfectly.

A number of the compositions, including “Ideas of North” and “Locks” are inspired by Reynold’s memories of growing up in Canada.

The album, by the way, is released on Fresh Sound, the Spanish label responsible for recordings by Kurt Rosenwinkel, Seamus Blake, and a host of other young jazz stars, as well as reissues of classic albums from the 40s, 50s and 60s.

It’s going to be a tough call on Friday night with a gypsy jazz tribute featuring Quinn Bachand, Richard Moody, Joey Smith, and Reuben Weir heating up Hermann’s at 8pm, but based on what I’ve been hearing on Reynolds’ website, I think I’m heading for the show at Allison’s.

If you are torn, you can always catch Reynolds for the first set and then head over to Hermann’s later. The tickets are reasonable for both shows and are available at the usual outlets.

“Night of the Cookers” Cooks

January 8, 2012 Comments off

Percussionist and impresario Kelby MacNayr asked if I would write a review of his newly-minted “Night of the Cookers” series that launched at Hermann’s last night with an appearance by Phil Dwyer accompanied by MacNayr on percussion and Ken Lister on bass.

I thought I probably wouldn’t because I’ve written a lot about Dwyer lately.

Then I went to the show and was once again gobsmacked by this giant of jazz who lives amongst us mere mortals here on Vancouver Island.

Covering everything from Coltrane to Evans to Rollins on sax and piano, along with a few original compositions and arrangements, Dwyer and the trio wowed a packed house that included a number of Victoria’s top jazz musicians.

Actually “covering” is the wrong word because Dwyer does more than that – he channels the jazz greats, all the while infusing their music with his own soulful and playful energy.

It goes without saying that he’s technically and musically brilliant, but he also brings a drive, energy, and joy to his playing that elevates the music, his audience, and his band mates as he challenges them to go beyond themselves.

Both Lister and MacNayr rose to that challenge, with Lister delivering several gorgeous bass solos and MacNayr, ever the consummate and subtle accompanist,  playing with added muscle.

It was a thrilling show, made all the better by Dwyer’s witty and adept handling of the drunk at the back who insisted on shouting out questions every time he introduced a tune.

Just before jumping into the closing piece, a slightly exasperated but still-in-good-humour Dwyer responded, “I don’t need to talk to you, I can listen to the voices in my own head.”

That pretty well silenced her and ultimately it was the music that spoke the loudest.

On Board With Departure

November 2, 2011 Comments off

Victoria jazz fans are in for a special treat this week with the appearance of Monik Nordine’s  quartet Departure on Sunday, November 6 at Hermann’s.

This melodic, innovative, fusion-tinged group features Juno award winners Buff Allen (drums) and Ken Lister (bass), with Brent Jarvis on Fender Rhodes and Nordine on soprano and alto saxes.

Nordine, who hails from Salt Spring and teaches at VIU in Nanaimo, recently moved to Victoria, providing an opportunity for Island Jazz to sit down and ask a few questions about Departure and its musical direction.

IJ: How did Departure get started?

MN: Departure started out as a writing project when I first showed up in Nanaimo.  I still have the first recording I made with James McRae and Phill Albert.  We each wrote a few tunes and jammed them at James’ place, then recorded with Rick Salt in Nanaimo.  Each of us had unique offerings, and from the original sessions my tune “Instep” remains and also Phill’s tune “Sireusly Mean”.  “Instep” later morphed into a different kind of tune when Sherry Clayton (drummer) and I used it as a vehicle for improv.  She was working out a funk feel in 3/4 and I brought my melody to her feel – just thought it might work, and it did!          

IJ: Why did you call yourselves Departure?

MN: We needed a name.  Phill suggested Departure after Departure Bay.  James and I liked it…  Afterward I realized it had other connotations, and liked that too.

IJ: Tell us more about those connotations.

Point of departure.  Departure physically from one location to another.  Departure from the norm.  hmm……  there are a few.  I think this band is definitely a spring board for me and that’s how I’d like to make it work.  As a point of musical departure.

IJ: What’s the group  about musically?

MN: When Brent joined me in this endeavor it became a different kind of band.  Partly because of his personality and set of skills, and also because with a chordal instrument things are just different.  Brent and I had talked about doing a project together in past years, and base it on original material.  So that’s what it became about at that point.  It was my suggestion to bring in the Fender Rhodes and I knew that he was into the sound of that instrument…  and in fact owns 2 Rhodes keyboards:  one for gigs which stays “in the box” and the other set up in his studio.  With the Rhodes there is the “throwback” to other bands, specifically Chick Corea.  Curiously, we don’t cover any Chick.  We’ve been covering Keith Jarrett a bit maybe because of my influence…  its hard to say.  Brent wrote a chart for “Questar” and I brought in a few others that we’ve not recorded yet.  So we’re an original jazz quartet with a fusion influence is the easiest way to describe it.

IJ: What do Ken Lister and Buff Allen bring to the group?

They each bring their own thing to it.  Buff is the nicest drummer to work with musically that I could dream of.  He’s just an amazing accompanist, very intuitive and easy to communicate with.  He really has a gift. And as far as the sound of the drums, it’s like a beautiful palette.  Ken is new to the group, so with Ken, there’s this wonderful solidness to the time. With his fluidity it’s just so easy to play with him – I don’t have to work at all on time – its all taken care of. Ken is the ultimate sideman.  I’m hoping that over time we’ll hear more of him in the sound of the band.

IJ You say you are fusion influenced. For some traditionalists “fusion” is a bit of a dirty word. Care to comment?

MN: Fusion is what jazz is.  Jazz originates from the fusion of European and African music.  It couldn’t have happened any other way.  So if fusion is a dirty word then jazz is dirty stuff, because as I said the origins are a fusion of styles, and ever since it began it’s just drawn from everything around it because its an improvised art form.  It even brought classical influences in with the arrangers such as Gil Evans to bring it full circle and rock and roll came from jazz and blues in the first place so why not use it in jazz?

You can learn more about Departure, sample some of their music and buy their album here. Better yet, catch them live on Sunday night (Hermann’s, 8pm, $15).  Highly recommended.

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